Tag Archives: healthy eating

Juice is good, but eating whole fruits and vegetables is even better!

Nutrition information is often confusing and conflicting, making healthy food choices a challenge. Fortunately, there are some recommendations that are consistent. Among these is eating more fruit and vegetables. Depending on how you consume these foods, you may be missing some of the nutrients that make them so healthy.

Continue reading

Second chance New Year’s resolutions for the whole family.

How are you doing on your New Year’s resolutions? Hopefully, you are still on track to meet your goals. If not, you are in good company. Research suggests that by this time well over halfof people who made New Year’s resolutions have either lost momentum or given up altogether and that only 8%will eventually achieve their goal.

It turns out that now is a perfect time to restart your stalled New Year’s resolution or finally get around to doing what you planned months ago. Since Labor Day marks the end of summer and the beginning of a new school year, so it is a natural time to set goals and make changes.

 

Here are some ideas for a few resolutions that your whole family can make that will help you all move, eat, and sleep better to make this new school year a happy and healthy one for everybody.

family-eating-at-the-table-

Continue reading

How to stay healthy at work.

Many people are trying to create a healthier lifestyle by eating healthier, making time for exercise or other activity, and reducing stress. Frequently, the focus is on what they can do at home, from prepping meals to joining a gym or going to yoga class. But many people spend a major part of their day at work, where healthy options are often limited. From the box of donuts at a morning meeting to a quick fast food lunch, eating well at work can be difficult. And for people who have office jobs, it also likely means lots of time sitting at a desk.

Fortunately, there are things you can do to make your time at work a little less damaging to your health. Even better, these steps can also make you more productive and feel better throughout the day.

Parr at desk 2-11-16

Continue reading

Let’s Agree to Agree About Food

Eating a healthy diet is a goal for many people to help them treat or prevent disease, improve exercise performance, or maintain a healthy body weight. If you pay attention to news about food and nutrition you have probably noticed that there is a great deal of controversy about what constitutes a healthy diet. It’s easy to find lists of foods to avoid and things to eat every day. Unfortunately, lists from different sources may not be the same or, worse, a food that is on one “never eat” list is on another “always eat” list.

There is a different approach you could take to plan the foundation for a truly health way to eat. Instead of focusing on what is different, think about what recommendations are shared among most “healthy” diets. Here is some diet advice that almost everyone agrees on. This is the topic of my Health & Fitness column in the Aiken Standard this week.

Group of people eating

Continue reading

Is chocolate healthy? That depends on what you mean by chocolate. And what you mean by healthy.

 

If you pay attention to nutrition news you may get the idea that achieving good health requires depriving yourself of foods you enjoy. Fortunately, this is not always the case. For example , eating certain types of chocolate has been linked to some health benefits.

The idea that chocolate may be healthy is no doubt welcome news for chocoholics. But it may leave you wondering if eating chocolate really is healthy. The answer depends on what you mean by chocolate and what you mean by healthy.

ChocolateA

Continue reading

It’s not about the diet. What you really need for successful weight loss.

If you are starting out 2019 by trying to lose weight, you are probably interested in finding the “best” diet. Unfortunately, there is no best diet for everyone, but there are some characteristics that you should look for in a diet. For example, a weight loss diet should be low (but not too low) in calories, reduce added sugar and excess carbohydrates, restrict portion sizes, emphasize healthy foods like fruits and vegetables, and promote healthy eating habits.

 

Real weight loss success depends on more than selecting the right diet. In fact, as long as your diet is low in calories, you will lose weight. However, this weight loss may be temporary and you, like many others, will gain it back later. There are factors beyond the specific diet you follow that are critical for losing weight and keeping it off. Since successful weight loss requires regular exercise, these same factors apply to exercise behaviors, too.

Continue reading

Get out of debt—health debt—in 2019.

Getting out of debt is a worthwhile goal and a common New Year’s resolution. This almost always means financial debt, which is a burden for millions of Americans. Many individuals and families have gotten themselves into debt by spending too much and not saving enough. For most, this situation has been years in the making, has no simple solution, and will have an impact lasting years into the future. Reducing this debt is essential for achieving financial health.

This is not the only type of debt we face—many people are also in health debt. Poor eating habits and increasingly sedentary lifestyles have led to an obesity epidemic. The problem is widespread, since most Americans are overweight, fewer than half of US adults meet minimum recommendations for physical activity, and about one in six adults smoke. Alone and especially in combination, these poor health habits are the major causes of the most common, and preventable, diseases including diabetes, heart disease, and some cancers.

Even if we have not been diagnosed with diabetes or heart disease or other health problems, our lifestyle has put us on that path. Small changes in what we eat or how active we are have added up over the years to create a condition of poor health. And our overall health and potential complications get worse year after year, so the longer we are overweight and inactive, the worse our health is likely to be in the future. That is our health debt. This is the topic of my Health & Fitness column in the Aiken Standard this week.

Continue reading