Tag Archives: coffee

That’s not coffee! It’s your morning milkshake.

Breakfast is often thought of as the most important meal of the day, for good reason. Eating a healthy breakfast provides energy to start the day and can be helpful for weight control. In children, a healthy breakfast is essential for proper growth and development and is linked to improved attention and learning in school. Unfortunately, many common breakfast foods are more like candy and soda than a healthy meal to start the day.

This is also true for breakfast drinks, including coffee drinks. Many popular coffee drinks are more similar to a milkshake than to actual coffee!

Take, for example, the grande (16 oz) Mocha Frappuccino blended coffee drink from Starbucks. This drink has 410 calories, 15 grams of fat, 61 grams of sugar, and 5 grams of protein. To put this in perspective, 61 grams of sugar is more than most people should have in an entire day!

You could order this drink with nonfat milk and no whipped cream. That’s a good idea, but it will still have 270 calories, 1 gram of fat, and 59 g sugar. That’s still a lot of sugar!

Let’s compare that to a small (16 oz.) McCafe Mocha Frappé from McDonald’s, which is essentially a coffee milkshake. It has 500 calories, 20 grams of fat, 66 grams of sugar, and 8 grams of protein.

Sure, the calories and sugar in the coffee drink aren’t quite as outrageous as the milkshake, but it’s close. This is especially clear when you compare the coffee drink to actual coffee. A grande (16 oz.) Pike Place Roast from Starbucks has 5 calories and no fat or sugar. If you like cream and sugar in your coffee, that adds 5 grams of sugar, 3 grams of fat, and about 50 calories, still way less than either “coffee” drink.

If you don’t want plain coffee a better choice might be a grande Starbucks Cappuccino, which has 140 calories, 7 g fat, and 10 g sugar. Get one with nonfat milk and you cut out 60 calories from fat. If you are worried about how much sugar you consume and how many calories you drink (you probably should be!), this is a much better coffee drink choice than a milkshake!

This isn’t specific to Starbucks. A medium (16 oz.) iced coffee at Dunkin’ Donuts has 130 calories and 28 grams of sugar. And that doesn’t include a donut.

Does this mean you can’t enjoy a delicious coffee drink? Of course not. But don’t try to fool yourself by calling it coffee. Depending on what you order, it may essentially be a milkshake! I think we can all agree that is not part of a healthy breakfast.

I call this idea that unhealthy food makes its way onto our breakfast table Candy & Soda for Breakfast. Foods like donuts and pastries are often topped with icing and it would be difficult to distinguish many muffins from cupcakes. Many “fruit” drinks contain little to no juice but plenty of added sugar, so they are essentially soda without bubbles.

And it’s not just breakfast, either. Lunch, dinner, and snacks frequently include foods that look like a healthy choice—yogurt, nuts, and granola bars are a few examples—but really are candy and soda in disguise.

Finally, healthy foods you want to eat!

If you pay attention to news about food and nutrition you have probably noticed that there is a great deal of controversy about what we should eat. Lists of foods to avoid and foods to eat every day are common. Unfortunately, lists from different sources may not be the same or, worse, a food that is on one “never eat” list is on another “always eat” list.

Often, it seems that the foods we should eat are not the things we enjoy the most. We are told to eat more vegetables and drink more water but avoid sweets and high-calorie restaurant meals. This leads many to develop the notion that good nutrition and good health are about depriving yourself of foods you enjoy. But this is not always the case. Sometimes, the foods we are supposed to eat and the foods we want to eat are the same.

Just in time for the holidays, here are three examples of foods that have health benefits that you can enjoy guilt-free—in moderation, of course!

This is the topic of my Health & Fitness column in the Aiken Standard this week.

Coffee chocolate wine


Chocolate

Chocolate, especially dark chocolate, contains phytochemicals, plant-derived compounds that have certain health benefits. Antioxidant flavonoids in chocolate have been shown to affect a variety of physiological systems. The beneficial effects include dilation of blood vessels, improved blood clotting, and reduced inflammation, all of which can reduce the risk of cardiovascular diseases including heart attack and stroke. Additionally, these flavonoids may lower blood pressure, regulate insulin levels, and reduce stress. These flavonoids are what give dark chocolate more of a bitter flavor than milk or white chocolate. Look for chocolate that contains at least 70% cocoa (sometimes listed on the label as cacao or cocoa solids) and remember that a small amount is enough.  Since chocolate does contain sugar and calories, eating more may not be the best idea.

 

Coffee

Coffee also contains many of the same or similar flavonoids as chocolate that have similar effects and benefits. Research shows that moderate coffee consumption (2-3 cups per day) is associated with a lower risk of heart disease. Coffee also contains caffeine which can have additional benefits related to alertness, attention, and physical performance. If you choose not to consume caffeine, decaffeinated coffee still contains the beneficial phytochemicals. But make sure you are drinking coffee. Many popular coffee drinks are more like milkshakes, with lots of added sugar and calories.

 

Wine

You have probably heard that red wine is good for you. Because it has many of the same antioxidant phytochemicals found in chocolate and coffee, drinking 1-2 glasses of red wine per day has been shown to reduce the risk of hypertension and heart disease. Obviously, wine contains alcohol so more isn’t better and non-drinkers are not encouraged to start.

 

The good news is that there are some foods you may enjoy that can actually be good for you. With all of these, more isn’t always better, so moderation is the key. Also keep in mind that many fruits contain the same antioxidants as chocolate, coffee or wine, so a serving of berries, for example, may be a better choice. And finally, achieving good health requires more than simply changing one aspect of what you eat, so include these foods as part of an otherwise healthy diet balanced by daily physical activity.


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Finally–Three healthy foods that you actually might like!

If you pay attention to news about food and nutrition you will notice that there is a great deal of controversy about what we should eat. Often it is very black and white: Some foods are good for you, while others are bad. In reality, nutrition information almost always falls in the gray area between good and bad. There are very few foods that are always bad for you, but some are certainly more healthful than others.

Eating more vegetables and drinking enough water are two examples of things that everyone should do and are included in nutrition recommendations, almost without exception. Everyone should eat more vegetables and drink more water!

There are some foods, though, that seem to have health benefits, but aren’t necessarily recommended for everyone. You don’t have to consume these foods, but if you do, they may be beneficial. This is usually due to the presence of a nutrient or other component of the food, and the health effect is usually small.

My Health & Fitness column in the Aiken Standard this week provides three examples of foods that have some health benefits.  You don’t have to eat them, but you may want to—in moderation, of course!

Coffee chocolate wine


Chocolate

Chocolate contains phytochemicals, plant-derived compounds that have health benefits. Indeed, chocolate does contain antioxidant flavonoids that have been shown to affect a variety of physiological systems. The beneficial effects include dilation of blood vessels, improved blood clotting, and reduced inflammation, all of which can reduce the risk of cardiovascular diseases including heart attack and stroke. Additionally, these flavonoids may lower blood pressure, regulate insulin levels, and reduce stress. These flavonoids are what give dark chocolate more of a bitter flavor than milk or white chocolate. Look for chocolate that contains at least 70% cocoa (sometimes listed on the label as cacao or cocoa solids) and remember that a small amount is enough.  Since chocolate does contain sugar and calories, eating more may not be the best idea.

Coffee

Coffee also contains many of the same or similar flavonoids as chocolate that have similar effects and benefits. Research shows that moderate coffee consumption (2-3 cups per day) is associated with a lower risk of heart disease. Coffee also contains caffeine which can have additional benefits related to alertness, attention, and exercise performance. If you choose not to consume caffeine, decaffeinated coffee still contains the beneficial phytochemicals. But make sure you are drinking coffee. Many popular coffee drinks are more like milkshakes, with lots of added sugar and calories.

Wine

You have probably heard that red wine is good for you. This is because it has many of the same antioxidant phytochemicals found in chocolate and coffee, wine can be a good source of these nutrients. Indeed, drinking 1-2 glasses of red wine has been shown to reduce the risk of hypertension and heart disease. Obviously, wine contains alcohol so more isn’t better and non-drinkers are not encouraged to start.

The good news is that there are some foods you may enjoy that can actually be good for you. With all of these, more isn’t better, so moderation is the key. Also keep in mind that many fruits contain the same antioxidants as chocolate, so a serving of berries, for example, may be a better choice. And finally, achieving good health requires more than simply changing one aspect of what you eat, so include these foods as part of a diet that includes real food balanced by daily physical activity.


Nutrition, exercise, and health information can be confusing. 
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